Neighbourhood Greenway Reduced Speed Pilot

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Neighbourhood greenways are on-street routes designated to comfortably and safely move both cyclists and pedestrians and motor vehicles. Greenways typically include a range of treatments from low-impact things like signage, bike signals, and pavement markings to varying degrees of traffic calming including a best-practice speed limit of 30 km/h.

Winnipeg currently has 11 greenways, all of which operate with a speed limit of 50 km/h. This summer, five of them are getting a (trial) speed reduction makeover.

The Neighbourhood Greenway Reduced

Neighbourhood greenways are on-street routes designated to comfortably and safely move both cyclists and pedestrians and motor vehicles. Greenways typically include a range of treatments from low-impact things like signage, bike signals, and pavement markings to varying degrees of traffic calming including a best-practice speed limit of 30 km/h.

Winnipeg currently has 11 greenways, all of which operate with a speed limit of 50 km/h. This summer, five of them are getting a (trial) speed reduction makeover.

The Neighbourhood Greenway Reduced Speed Pilot will evaluate the impact reduced speeds and additional traffic calming treatments have on improving conditions for cyclists and pedestrians along the following existing neighbourhood greenways:

The pilot is planned to be in place for one year at each location. Learn more about the proposed changes below.

We want to hear what residents along and nearby the planned pilot locations have to say about the current greenways, the reduced speed pilot plan, and what impact the proposed pilot may have on their travel choices. We will report back in June/July on what we heard and will then announce implementation plans.


Background

In 2020, the Standing Policy Committee on Infrastructure Renewal and Public Works directed the City to pilot reduced speeds on five existing neighbourhood greenways. Working with area Councillors, the City selected five greenways (all of which already have some existing traffic calming treatments and enhanced pedestrian crossings) for the pilot program.

The speed limit will be lowered on each of the five planned pilot locations, and each will also receive a variety of new traffic calming interventions ranging from new signage and barricades to speed humps and enhanced pedestrian crossings.

Technical guidance and case studies from other cities tell us that these measures should reduce vehicle speeds and volumes, increasing safety and comfort for cyclists and creating a more desirable environment for both cyclists and pedestrians.

Case study: In the early 2000’s, the City of Portland set out to ensure at least 80 percent of their residents had access to a neighbourhood greenway within a half-mile of home by 2015 (watch the project video that explains their plans and progress). As their greenway network grew, the Portland Bureau of Transportation saw a number of benefits for their community – including some they didn’t anticipate. As expected, vehicle volumes along the greenways lessened and bike volumes exponentially increased. But the changes didn’t stop there. Schools started reporting more kids riding bikes to class more often, and also saw younger kids learning to ride a bike earlier. Today, Portland has a robust greenway network that is growing year over year.


While the pilot program may slightly increase travel time for some, the intent is for these streets to shift to serving local-only motor vehicle traffic and increased cycling and pedestrian through traffic. We also recognize traffic may slightly increase on surrounding streets, but other cities’ experiences and technical data tell us the increase should be minor, which would mean an acceptable trade-off for increasing safety and vitality of these important route types.

DESIGN DETAILS

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    Roch Street from Poplar Avenue to Leighton Avenue

    15 days ago

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    Roch Street is an existing north-south neighbourhood greenway in the Elmwood-East Kildonan ward. It parallels Watt Street and Henderson Highway offering an important cycling connector from northeast Winnipeg to Downtown.
    Planned traffic calming treatments include reducing the posted speed limit, and installing speed humps.


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    Eugenie Street from St. Mary’s Road to Youville Street

    15 days ago

    [select map to enlarge]
    Eugenie Street is an existing east-west neighbourhood greenway in the St. Boniface ward. It parallels Marion and Goulet Streets and connects to existing neighbourhood greenways on Youville Street and Edgewood and Tremblay Street/pedestrian bridge over the Seine River. It serves as an important cycling connector from southeast Winnipeg to Downtown.
    Planned traffic calming treatments include reducing the posted speed limit, installing speed humps, and providing enhanced pedestrian crossings of Tache Avenue and Des Meurons Street.

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    Warsaw Avenue from Thurso Street to Pembina Highway

    15 days ago


    [select map to enlarge]
    Warsaw Avenue is part of an existing east-west neighbourhood greenway route in the River Heights – Fort Garry and Fort Rouge – East Fort Garry wards. The route parallels Corydon Avenue and connects to an existing neighbourhood greenway on Nassau Street N and protected bike lanes on Pembina Highway. This route serves as an important cycling connector from southwest Winnipeg to Osborne Village and the Downtown.
    Planned traffic calming treatments include reducing the posted speed limit, and installing speed humps.


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    Machray Avenue from Fife Street to Main Street

    15 days ago

    [select map to enlarge]
    Machray Avenue is an existing east-west neighbourhood greenway in the Mynarski ward. The route parallels Inkster Boulevard and connects to an existing neighbourhood greenway on Powers Street. This route serves as an important cycling connector in northwest Winnipeg and will represent the connection between the planned Northwest Hydro Corridor that parallels McPhillips Street and neighbourhoods to the east including Downtown.
    Planned traffic calming treatments include reducing the posted speed limit, and installing speed humps.


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    Powers Street from Dufferin Avenue to Partridge Avenue

    15 days ago

    [select map to enlarge]
    Powers Street is an existing north-south neighbourhood greenway in the Mynarski ward. The route parallels Salter Street and connects to existing neighbourhood greenways on Machray and Flora Avenues. This route serves as an important cycling connector in northwest Winnipeg.
    Planned traffic calming treatments include reducing the posted speed limit, installing speed humps, providing an enhanced pedestrian crossing at Mountain Avenue and closing the medians on Burrows Avenue and Inkster Boulevard to motor vehicles while still permitting bicycles and pedestrians.
    Implications of the median closures would limit through vehicle movements on Powers Street at these intersections as... Continue reading